Be Open to Big Vision Photobombs

While visiting New Mexico this summer, I raised my phone to take a photo of some pink flowers against a blue sky when this happened:

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This hummingbird flew right into my frame and posed for a long time (at least by hummingbird standards). It was a magical moment, especially because hummingbirds have always been an “auspicious symbol” for me.

Sometimes when we’re working on our big vision: noticing what sparkles, letting go of old visions to be open to the new, and running towards what excites us, something unexpected shows up right in front of our face. It might even be more wonderful than the vision we imagined. Why not focus on it, before it flies away?

Don’t Be Shy. Run Towards Your Big Vision.

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As I was walking to work one day this week, I saw this cute Corgi on the street. At first he was shy. He watched me with half of his face hidden behind the wall. But as I walked closer, his excitement overwhelmed him. He ran out of hiding to say hello and invited me to pet him (so soft!).

Sometimes that’s how we are with our Big Visions. Shy at first. Testing the waters. Not wanting to make a commitment. But here’s the important part. The excitement. When we get SO excited about something that we just HAVE to do it, or learn more about it, or share it with others, we need to let go and run towards it.

When you feel pulled towards something that makes you go “Oooooooh!” Move towards it. Get closer. See what it’s all about. For example, I often take photos on my walks to and from work.

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A color will catch my eye and compel me to take out my phone and look closer.

 

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Sometimes I decide that it doesn’t look as great as I thought it would, and I keep walking.

 

Fall leaves

Other times, halfway through editing it on Instagram, I’ll decide that the image or moment isn’t drawing me in anymore. I discard the edits and delete the photo.

Sunset

But a lot of the time, if I stop to photograph something I feel inexplicably drawn to, the photo turns out even more beautifully than I could have imagined. And that makes me happy. Very happy.

Big Vision experiment: Move towards what excites you, attracts you, or draws you in this week.

All photos by me.

When Your Big Vision Dies . . .

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“The Death of a tree is the birth of a log or a snag [a standing dead or dying tree]. Dead trees are essential to the health of the forest and they are the basis of its astonishing productivity. Fallen trees are a substantial reservoir of organic matter and water that other plants and trees depend on. . . As a tree slowly decays, it becomes a nursery for plants. It may take 400 years or longer to become incorporated into the forest floor. During this time, a variety of shrubs and trees have the opportunity to develop part or all of their root systems within the decaying wood.” - California State Parks guide for the Founders’ Grove in the Humboldt Redwoods State Park.

A couple weeks ago, I went on vacation along The North Coast or “Redwood Coast” of California. The hubs and I spent a lot of time hiking, and we did some camping among the giant redwood trees. It was wonderful.

Burned tree

I was particularly struck by how intertwined death and life are in the forest (Did you know that the greatest accumulation of biomass [living and dead organic material] ever recorded on earth is in Humboldt Redwoods State Park?).

I knew in theory that when things died they provided nutrients for living things. “Cycle of life,” “when one door closes, another opens,” and all that, but there was something about seeing so many fallen and standing dead trees, and the life that grew out of them that amazed me.

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There were also a lot of fire-scarred trees, and trees with crazy holes through them. The forest wasn’t just filled with natural beauty, it was also filled with destruction, natural and man-made (96 percent of the original old-growth coast redwoods have been logged).

Me in the Redwoods

Sometimes when we are pursuing our Big Vision, things die (goals, habits, identities, ways of being, jobs, where we live, relationships). The destruction can happen by our hand, or by others’, deliberately, or against our will. Reality is, death, destruction and challenges will happen. On the up side, the growth of new things and “nutrients” for existing things can come out of those deaths.

One of the things that helps redwoods survive strong winds and floods is to intertwine roots with other redwoods, so when a storm rolls into your Big Vision, or your life in general, find someone to intertwine your roots with and hold on!

All photos by me and the hubs.

Looking for Your Big Vision? Notice What “Sparkles”

sparklesA friend who is between jobs recently asked me, “Is there one piece of advice you would give to a creative person when they are looking for their next job, or project?”

I responded, “Notice what ‘sparkles’ for you.”

I think of “sparkles” as things that make you smile, makes time fly, or that you all of a sudden become very curious about (even if you don’t understand why).

If you are a “creative” type, you already know that most creative projects don’t usually happen in a straight line: A to Z. They often begin with something small: a craving for an ingredient, a phrase you can’t stop thinking about, an attraction to a color, or a problem that piques your interest. My experience has been that if you follow that sparkle, and the next one and the next one, they will take you on a curvy route to your next big vision.

If you’re in the middle of a transition and trying to figure out what to do next, follow you sparkles, even if they don’t make logical sense. They will light the way.

Try this:

Over the next three days, notice what “sparkles” for you:

  • What brings you joy?
  • What are you attracted to?
  • What are you curious about?

Capture your “sparkles” in your journal, in a conversation with a friend, or with photos.

  • Are there any themes that run through all of your sparkles?
  • How can you bring more of what sparkles into your life?

Big Vision Tip: Stay on Track. Text Your Big Vision Buddy

Heather-Alaine-Big-Vision-BuddyAbout a year and a half ago my friend Heather and I decided to try the Oprah and Deepak 21-Day Meditation Experience. To make sure we completed it, we texted each other right after we meditated. There were many mornings when I would “forget” to meditate (isn’t it funny how our minds do that when we’re resisting something?), and her text would prompt me to do it.

It worked so well that even when the 21 days were over, we continued to text each other after we meditated. A year and half later, our meditation practices certainly aren’t perfect, but they’re so much a part of our lives that we no longer text about it. We’ve moved on to new projects!

Heather is working on finishing her book, and I’m trying to get back into the swing of regular blogging, so now we text each when we’re going to write, and when we finish. Once again, it’s working! I’m posting here for the first time in almost two months.

It’s such a simple process, but one that has made a huge difference in our lives.

Below are a few tips for texting with your Big Vision Buddy:

  • Pick a Big Vision Buddy who is also working on a project, or habit. It’s more fun for the support to be two-way, rather than one-way.
  • Also, your Buddy should be someone who you aren’t competitive with, or who isn’t emotionally invested in the completion of your goal, or project.
  • Nudge don’t judge. If your Buddy hasn’t texted you in a while, gently ask them how things are going, and how you can support their getting back on track.

Big Vision to-dos for you:

  • Pick a project, or habit you would like to work on this week, this month, or this fall.
  • Ask someone to be your Big Vision Buddy.
  • Start texting!

Speaking of which, I’m going to go text Heather now!

Photo of Heather by In Her Image Photography