#sharebeauty November 1-22, 2017

Share Beauty on Social Media November 1-22

My friend Gabriela Masala and I are doing a little experiment in November and we hope you’ll join us.

We’re committing to share beauty-full words, images and/or videos on social media November 1-22, 2017 with the hashtag #sharebeauty22.

During one of our conversations about what’s going on in the world today, Gabriela and I decided that the intentional seeking & sharing of beauty for 22 days on social media could be a way to counterbalance the steady stream of disturbing news we’re consuming these days. As an article I read recently says, joy can be an act of resistance. So can seeking and sharing beauty in a world where some humans are behaving extra badly.

Beauty takes many forms. It can be found in the shadow and in the light, so don’t feel like you can only post about flowers and rainbows! Share words, images and videos that are beautiful to you.

I hope you’ll join us. If you’d like to invite friends to do it too, below are some text and images to get you started:

#sharebeauty22

Facebook

I’m committing to share beauty-full words, images and/or videos on social media November 1-22, 2017 with the hashtag #sharebeauty22. I believe that the intentional seeking & sharing of beauty for 22 days on social media can be a healthy break from the steady stream of heavy news we’re consuming these days. Beauty takes many forms. It can be found in the shadow and in the light. Don’t feel like you can only post about flowers and rainbows! Share words, images and videos that are beautiful to YOU.

#sharebeauty22 is a project created by Gabriela Masala & Britt Bravo

#sharebeauty

Instagram

I’m committing to share beauty-full words, images and/or videos on social media November 1-22, 2017 with the hashtag #sharebeauty22. I believe that the intentional seeking & sharing of beauty for 22 days on social media can be a healthy break from the steady stream of heavy news we’re consuming these days. Beauty takes many forms. It can be found in the shadow and in the light. Don’t feel like you can only post about flowers and rainbows! Share words, images and videos that are beautiful to YOU.

#sharebeauty22 is a project created by @gabrielamasala & @bbravo

#sharebeautytwitter

Twitter

I commit to share beauty-full words, images &/or videos on social media Nov. 1-22. Join me! #sharebeauty22 h/t @onelovealliance & @Bbravo

I’m looking forward to seeing your beauty-full word, images and/or videos!

~Britt

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Sunset

May you be kind to your writing self

“When we resist doing our art it’s because we’re resisting some deeper truth we’re not ready or willing to face. So when we find ourselves in that spot, we need a big dollop of self-care, kindness and compassion in order to be willing to create again.” ~ Chris Zydel

The term “inner critic” gets thrown around a lot in relation to the creative process. All kinds of suggestions are given for how to quiet the voice that tells you that what you’re making isn’t good enough.

We’re told to talk to our inner critic, write a letter to our inner critic, draw a picture of our inner critic and throw it in the trash, etc.

For whatever reason, inner critic exercises have never worked for me. It reminds me of working in a classroom with a student who has behavioral issues. If you put all of your attention on that child, especially negative attention, things go sideways for the whole class. Giving one’s inner critic a lot of time and energy has always felt like the wrong strategy to me.

So then what do you do if while you are writing, or making art, or creating anything the voice in your head keeps saying, “This is not good enough.”

Continue reading

How can you use social media to lift us up?

Do this . . .

Don’t do that . . .

Listen to this . . .

Don’t listen to that . . .

Read this . . .

Don’t read that . . .

Think about this  . . .

Don’t think about that . . .

Believe this . . .

Continue reading

You are a good writer. Really.

“I’m not a good writer.”

I hear this often from my clients and students.

Does writing come more easily to some people than to others? Yup.

Does writing take practice? Yup.

Can having someone edit your work improve your writing? Yup.

Continue reading

Weeding, Small Steps, and Finding Time

As the season of intense rain in Northern California winds down, it’s time to face the tremendous amount of weeds taking over our front yard. This medium-sized triangular patch is full of sprawling clover, tough grass, dead dandelions, and scary spiky plants.

I actually like gardening. When we first moved into our home, I took an adult education course on native plants in California, and put in a few, but then I got so busy with work and life that the yard filled up with weeds again. I’d let them grow so high and wild that when I had a free weekend to pull them out, I could only clear a small patch.

Some years, I’d hire someone to remove the weeds, but then I didn’t make time to put in new plants, or keep up with the weeding, and the weeds returned.

Each day when I walk out the door, I feel a little sad when I look at our front yard. “Someday I’ll have time to create a nice garden/yard/flower patch,” I sigh. But it never happens.

This has been going on for over 10 years.

Someone recently suggested that I spend a half an hour each day weeding. “I know your schedule is super busy, ” she said, “Just give it a shot.”

I could think of all kinds of reasons this wasn’t going to work:

  • What if . . . I can’t get my work done because I took time to weed?
  • What if . . . I get so dirty I have to take a shower? I don’t have time for that!
  • What if  . . . I’m not strong enough to pull out all the weeds?
  • What if  . . . that mean-looking plant with the thorns attacks me?

Blah, blah, blah.

This past Monday, I turned the volume down on the “what if” recording and just did it. I set my iPhone alarm for 30 minutes and pulled weeds. Although I didn’t make a massive amount of progress, it was enough that when I walked out the front door on Tuesday morning, instead of feeling sad, I felt happy. “Well, look at that,” I thought, “I’m getting a little closer to what I want.”

On Tuesday afternoon, after I finished my work for the day, I spent another 30 minutes weeding, and on Wednesday another 30. Between each weeding session, I’d find myself thinking about what section I was going to work on next, when in the day I was going to do it, and future projects that could make our yard nicer.

Because I only weeded for 30 minutes each time, I wasn’t as wiped out as when I would try to tackle the whole yard in a weekend. In fact, I usually wanted to do more when the 30-minute timer went off.

Why am I telling you this story about weeding?

As I was weeding, I started to think about other large projects I’d like to accomplish in my life, and how much progress I could make if I set aside 30 minutes each day, which, if I actually did that for 365 days, would add up to 182.5 hours per year.

I’m thinking that there is probably a writing, or creative project, or business goal that you’ve wanted to do for a long time, but you can never find the time. One of the most common responses to my Calling All Healers survey was that many of you are part-time entrepreneurs either because you have a part-time, or full-time day job, and/or you are a part-time, or full-time caretaker to a parent, and/or children. Making time for your writing, creative work and/or business is a challenge. Perhaps trying a version of the 30-minute weeding experiment can help you make progress towards one of your goals.

It really helps that I can see the progress I’m making, so if you’re working on a project where the results of the time you’re spending isn’t immediately evident; create something visual to represent it, like the equivalent of a fundraising thermometer. You can see some ideas in my Pinterest search results for a “visual goal tracker.”

What is a writing, or creative project, or business goal that you could experiment with spending 30-minutes a day on?

If you try it, let me know how it goes!

Photos by Britt Bravo.